NASA to Announce ‘Surprising’ Europa Discovery Monday

upiter's moon Europa, as seen by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute
Uncategorized
Share
upiter's moon Europa, as seen by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute
upiter’s moon Europa, as seen by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute

From space.com

NASA will announce new findings about Jupiter’s ocean-harboring moon Europa during a news conference at 2 p.m. EDT (1800 GMT) on Monday (Sept. 26).

“Astronomers will present results from a unique Europa observing campaign that resulted in surprising evidence of activity that may be related to the presence of a subsurface ocean on Europa,” NASA officials wrote in a media advisory Tuesday (Sept. 20).

The new information comes courtesy of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, agency officials said. You can follow the news conference live here at Space.com, courtesy of NASA.


NASA to Announce ‘Surprising’ Europa Discovery Monday
Jupiter’s moon Europa, as seen by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute
NASA will announce new findings about Jupiter’s ocean-harboring moon Europa during a news conference at 2 p.m. EDT (1800 GMT) on Monday (Sept. 26).

“Astronomers will present results from a unique Europa observing campaign that resulted in surprising evidence of activity that may be related to the presence of a subsurface ocean on Europa,” NASA officials wrote in a media advisory Tuesday (Sept. 20).

The new information comes courtesy of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, agency officials said. You can follow the news conference live here at Space.com, courtesy of NASA.

The participants in Monday’s briefing are:

Paul Hertz, director of the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington.
William Sparks, astronomer with the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore.
Britney Schmidt, assistant professor at the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta.
Jennifer Wiseman, senior Hubble project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
Astrobiologists regard Europa as one of the solar system’s best bets to host alien life. The 1,900-mile-wide (3,100 kilometers) moon harbors a huge ocean of liquid water beneath its icy shell; furthermore, astronomers think this ocean is in contact with Europa’s rocky mantle, making possible all sorts of interesting chemical reactions.

Tuesday’s media advisory offered no further details about what the researchers will announce on Monday, but the involvement of Hubble raises the possibility that Europa’s elusive plumes may finally have been spotted again.


NASA to Announce ‘Surprising’ Europa Discovery Monday
Jupiter’s moon Europa, as seen by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute
NASA will announce new findings about Jupiter’s ocean-harboring moon Europa during a news conference at 2 p.m. EDT (1800 GMT) on Monday (Sept. 26).

“Astronomers will present results from a unique Europa observing campaign that resulted in surprising evidence of activity that may be related to the presence of a subsurface ocean on Europa,” NASA officials wrote in a media advisory Tuesday (Sept. 20).

The new information comes courtesy of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, agency officials said. You can follow the news conference live here at Space.com, courtesy of NASA.

The participants in Monday’s briefing are:

Paul Hertz, director of the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington.
William Sparks, astronomer with the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore.
Britney Schmidt, assistant professor at the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta.
Jennifer Wiseman, senior Hubble project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
Astrobiologists regard Europa as one of the solar system’s best bets to host alien life. The 1,900-mile-wide (3,100 kilometers) moon harbors a huge ocean of liquid water beneath its icy shell; furthermore, astronomers think this ocean is in contact with Europa’s rocky mantle, making possible all sorts of interesting chemical reactions.

Tuesday’s media advisory offered no further details about what the researchers will announce on Monday, but the involvement of Hubble raises the possibility that Europa’s elusive plumes may finally have been spotted again.

In December 2012, Hubble detected what appeared to be plumes of water vapor extending about 120 miles (200 km) into space from Europa’s south pole. This news, which was made public in late 2013, caused a great deal of excitement in the astrobiology community, because it suggested that a robotic probe may be able to sample Europa’s ocean without landing on the moon’s surface.

The detection team has been eyeing Europa with Hubble extensively since that initial observation, but to date they have not been able to confirm the existence of the plume.

—Read more at: http://www.space.com/34131-jupiter-moon-europa-hubble-telescope-announcement.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=socialfbspc&cmpid=social_spc_514630

Uncategorized
No more dissident voices: Succumb to Facebook & Twitter’s demands or get banned (or both)
Share

A recent purge by Facebook and Twitter of a host of independent media sites has pushed thousands of people out of work and has killed one of the most effective forms of expressing political dissent. Related PostsThis Is What Mind Control Looks Like – VIDEOWhen It Comes to Fake News, …

Uncategorized
‘Ancient Egyptian pigment can boost energy efficiency’
Share

A colour developed by Egyptians thousands of years ago can boost energy efficiency by cooling rooftops and walls, and could also enable solar generation of electricity via windows, scientists say. Egyptian blue, derived from calcium copper silicate, was routinely used on ancient depictions of gods and royalty, according to the …

Uncategorized
Father Of World Wide Web Launches Platform Which Aims To Radically Decentralize The Internet
Share

“For people who want to make sure the Web serves humanity, we have to concern ourselves with what people are building on top of it,” Tim Berners-Lee told Vanity Fair last month. “I was devastated” he said while going through a litany of harmful and dangerous developments of the past three decades …