Humans Really Are Made of Stardust, and a New Study Proves It

An artist's view of our Milky Way. A new study has mapped the abundance of elements found in the human body, the building blocks of life, in the stars of the Milky Way. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Uncategorized
Share

From space.com > January 11, 2017 > SilentCircle > Uncategorized

An artist's view of our Milky Way. A new study has mapped the abundance of elements found in the human body, the building blocks of life, in the stars of the Milky Way. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
An artist’s view of our Milky Way. A new study has mapped the abundance of elements found in the human body, the building blocks of life, in the stars of the Milky Way.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

For decades, science popularizers have said humans are made of stardust, and now, a new survey of 150,000 stars shows just how true the old cliché is: Humans and their galaxy have about 97 percent of the same kind of atoms, and the elements of life appear to be more prevalent toward the galaxy’s center, the research found.

The crucial elements for life on Earth, often called the building blocks of life, can be abbreviated as CHNOPS: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur. For the first time, astronomers have cataloged the abundance of these elements in a huge sample of stars.

The astronomers evaluated each element’s abundance through a method called spectroscopy; each element emits distinct wavelengths of light from within a star, and they measured the depth of the dark and bright patches in each star’s light spectrum to determine what it was made of. [The Milky Way: A Traveler’s Guide]
Humans Really Are Made of Stardust, and a New Study Proves It
An artist’s view of our Milky Way. A new study has mapped the abundance of elements found in the human body, the building blocks of life, in the stars of the Milky Way.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
For decades, science popularizers have said humans are made of stardust, and now, a new survey of 150,000 stars shows just how true the old cliché is: Humans and their galaxy have about 97 percent of the same kind of atoms, and the elements of life appear to be more prevalent toward the galaxy’s center, the research found.

The crucial elements for life on Earth, often called the building blocks of life, can be abbreviated as CHNOPS: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur. For the first time, astronomers have cataloged the abundance of these elements in a huge sample of stars.

The astronomers evaluated each element’s abundance through a method called spectroscopy; each element emits distinct wavelengths of light from within a star, and they measured the depth of the dark and bright patches in each star’s light spectrum to determine what it was made of. [The Milky Way: A Traveler’s Guide]

The researchers used stellar measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s (SDSS) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) spectrograph in New Mexico. APOGEE can peer through the dust in the Milky Way because it uses infrared wavelengths, which pass through dust.

“This instrument collects light in the near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum and disperses it, like a prism, to reveal signatures of different elements in the atmospheres of stars,” Sloan representatives said in a statement.

“A fraction of the almost 200,000 stars surveyed by APOGEE overlap with the sample of stars targeted by the NASA Kepler mission, which was designed to find potentially Earth-like planets,” the statement added. “The work presented today focuses on ninety Kepler stars that show evidence of hosting rocky planets, and which have also been surveyed by APOGEE.”

Although humans share most elements with the stars, the proportions of those elements differ between humans and stars. For example, humans are about 65 percent oxygen by mass, whereas oxygen makes up less than 1 percent of all elements measured in space (such as in the spectra of stars).

The six most common elements of life on Earth (including more than 97 percent of the mass of a human body) are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur and phosphorus. Those same elements are abundant at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. Credit: Dana Berry/SkyWorks Digital Inc.; SDSS collaboration
The six most common elements of life on Earth (including more than 97 percent of the mass of a human body) are carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur and phosphorus. Those same elements are abundant at the center of our Milky Way galaxy.
Credit: Dana Berry/SkyWorks Digital Inc.; SDSS collaboration

Continue reading: http://www.space.com/35276-humans-made-of-stardust-galaxy-life-elements.html?cmpid=social_spc_514648&utm_content=buffer8b586&utm_medium=social&utm_source=plus.google.com&utm_campaign=buffer


Uncategorized
Stanford Prof: “We have proof of UFOs!”
Share

From ufopartisan.blogspot.co.uk Peter Sturrock is an emeritus professor of applied physics at Stanford University and one of the very few scientists who has publicly expressed a great deal of interest in UFOs and acted on that interest by twice surveying colleagues on the subject which resulted in some very surprising …

Uncategorized
TECH INSIDERS: ‘OUR MINDS CAN BE HIJACKED’
Share

From theguardian.com Google, Twitter and Facebook workers who helped make technology so addictive are disconnecting themselves from the internet. Paul Lewis reports on the Silicon Valley refuseniks who worry the race for human attention has created a world of perpetual distraction that could ultimately end in disaster. ustin Rosenstein had …

Luis Elizondo is a career intelligence officer whose experience includes working with the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, the National Counterintelligence Executive, and the Director of National Intelligence.
Uncategorized
“UFOs Are Real,” says Former DoD, Intellgence Officer
Share

From theufochronicles.com Something extraordinary was revealed today. Former high-level officials and scientists with deep black experience who have always remained in the shadows came forward on one platform. These insiders have long-standing connections to government agencies which may have programs investigating unidentifed aerial phenomena (UAP/UFOs). The team includes a 25-year …